info
the torn cloth

Panos Famelis
the torn cloth

Curation: Katerina Nikou

In an urban workspace in the center of Athens, painter Panos Famelis artfully presents the torn cloth.

Panos Famelis’ new exhibition is hosted at the project room at busybuilding. In a distinctively familiar contemplation, a new series of works is presented that carries a discreet lyricism— and that comments upon the emotional relationship between imagination and the exterior world through the use of matter in contemporary art (color, drawing, sculpture). Regarding space, Panos Famelis suggestively displays his own questions: what is space, how is it defined, who defines it and who creates it, how do human relationships are formed within it, what is the space in the middle, whether space exists at all, and what’s the case with empty space after all?

Famous architect Philippe Gazeau, acclaimed for the way he combines urban philosophy with architecture, says this: … Architecture is an adventurous exploration of the real; it exists above all for the purpose of inventing new situations that go beyond use, form, and materials… That is exactly what the viewer understands by observing Panos Famelis’ works: the intention of discovering the real and the creation of those conditions whereby the real can become possible, through the constant search of its own substance. The concept of the real on which Famelis commentates can potentially be taking place under some situations that are to a certain extent imaginary, in an unconscious alternation of reality and transgression. Freed from limitations in relation to matter and form he constructs conditions for the geometric schematization of the air and reveals the reality of material existence and its progression into the surrounding space.

The sense of a neutral/undefined space is intense, both in his paintings and his sculptures. His painting unfolds unassumingly in the form of a personal diary, creating a sense of euphoria and uplift. He personally introduces us into a non-realistic world, but still through pleasant color compositions and by posing questions in relation to the concept of deceit. The paintings present undefined architectural complexes that are transported into three-dimensional space through the sculptures. The latter constitute the spatial-formalistic rendition of the former. They could be treated as undefined thought-constructing machines that activate and are activated by imagination. But their main precondition is involving the viewer in this dialectic relationship that develops between himself, the creator and the work. Spontaneously tracing back this particular question on the relationship between viewer and artist/artwork in the history of art, I recall Marcel Duchamp and his text The Creative Act. Here Duchamp presents his reasoning on the axis viewer-artist and mentions the phenomenon of art-coefficient, i.e. the intermediary relationships that occur between the artwork and the viewer, and the artist’s attempt to express that which is tacit but intentional and that which is expressed without being intended.

The undefined and uncontrollable relationship between artwork and viewer leads to exactly that which Panos Famelis highlights through the torn cloth, in undefined space. The exhibition’s title refers to a six-minute scene from Orson Welles’ unfinished film, Don Quixote*.

The imaginary/real combination of non-relations that happen in undefined spaces finds the torn cloth as its meeting point, where viewer and creator contest and at the same time converse. the torn cloth is the means, the artist’s trick for introducing us into a process of thought and deconstruction of social space, which in turn consistutes the basic condition for its re-composition and reconstruction.

*Orson Welles’ Don Quixote is an unfinished film in which he was the producer, the writer and the director.

Orson Welles worked on this periodically until his death in 1985.

Translated from the Greek by Kiriakos Spirou.

exhibitions

Solo show, busybuilding project room, Athens, 2015

Panos Famelis
the torn cloth

Curation: Katerina Nikou

In an urban workspace in the center of Athens, painter Panos Famelis artfully presents the torn cloth.

Panos Famelis’ new exhibition is hosted at the project room at busybuilding. In a distinctively familiar contemplation, a new series of works is presented that carries a discreet lyricism— and that comments upon the emotional relationship between imagination and the exterior world through the use of matter in contemporary art (color, drawing, sculpture). Regarding space, Panos Famelis suggestively displays his own questions: what is space, how is it defined, who defines it and who creates it, how do human relationships are formed within it, what is the space in the middle, whether space exists at all, and what’s the case with empty space after all?

Famous architect Philippe Gazeau, acclaimed for the way he combines urban philosophy with architecture, says this: … Architecture is an adventurous exploration of the real; it exists above all for the purpose of inventing new situations that go beyond use, form, and materials… That is exactly what the viewer understands by observing Panos Famelis’ works: the intention of discovering the real and the creation of those conditions whereby the real can become possible, through the constant search of its own substance. The concept of the real on which Famelis commentates can potentially be taking place under some situations that are to a certain extent imaginary, in an unconscious alternation of reality and transgression. Freed from limitations in relation to matter and form he constructs conditions for the geometric schematization of the air and reveals the reality of material existence and its progression into the surrounding space.

The sense of a neutral/undefined space is intense, both in his paintings and his sculptures. His painting unfolds unassumingly in the form of a personal diary, creating a sense of euphoria and uplift. He personally introduces us into a non-realistic world, but still through pleasant color compositions and by posing questions in relation to the concept of deceit. The paintings present undefined architectural complexes that are transported into three-dimensional space through the sculptures. The latter constitute the spatial-formalistic rendition of the former. They could be treated as undefined thought-constructing machines that activate and are activated by imagination. But their main precondition is involving the viewer in this dialectic relationship that develops between himself, the creator and the work. Spontaneously tracing back this particular question on the relationship between viewer and artist/artwork in the history of art, I recall Marcel Duchamp and his text The Creative Act. Here Duchamp presents his reasoning on the axis viewer-artist and mentions the phenomenon of art-coefficient, i.e. the intermediary relationships that occur between the artwork and the viewer, and the artist’s attempt to express that which is tacit but intentional and that which is expressed without being intended.

The undefined and uncontrollable relationship between artwork and viewer leads to exactly that which Panos Famelis highlights through the torn cloth, in undefined space. The exhibition’s title refers to a six-minute scene from Orson Welles’ unfinished film, Don Quixote*.

The imaginary/real combination of non-relations that happen in undefined spaces finds the torn cloth as its meeting point, where viewer and creator contest and at the same time converse. the torn cloth is the means, the artist’s trick for introducing us into a process of thought and deconstruction of social space, which in turn consistutes the basic condition for its re-composition and reconstruction.

*Orson Welles’ Don Quixote is an unfinished film in which he was the producer, the writer and the director.

Orson Welles worked on this periodically until his death in 1985.

Translated from the Greek by Kiriakos Spirou.

info exhibitions

Solo show, busybuilding project room, Athens, 2015

solo show

the torn cloth